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20121201
20121231
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CSPAN
Dec 7, 2012 12:00pm EST
the other lesson learned for us is to look beyond the tactical level of training that's provided by the department of defense to consider what ways we might also engage in terms of institutional development with the defense institutions and that's something in the last several years where we are ramping up in the department of the ability to provide advisers and other types of institutional reform engagement with various military partners to ensure that just as we are looking at strengthening of the tactical level we are also focusing on the institutional strength of these defense institutions. >> ms. dory can we afford to wait a year for planning, training, assembly of a regional force for the completion of negotiations for the successful election in some press accounts aqim is described as this point the best funded and best equipped most potentially lethal affiliate in the world and those accounts are overblown but the suggestion is we should have an area the size of texas controlled by terrorists engaged in drug trafficking and kidnappings that have had an inflow of some soph
CSPAN
Dec 19, 2012 8:00pm EST
to cut u.s. ambassador christina and three other americans. the report cited systemic failures, leadership and management efficiencies and inadequate security at the conflict facility. three state department officials including eric boswell, assistant secretary of state in diplomatic security have resigned in the wake of the report. next, senators on the foreign relations committee who received the report speak to reporters. how not [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible] >> my understanding is that the standard with which the accountability board looks at people is a very high standard called breach of duty. but there's no question that there were people within the state department that were missed and did not execute in an appropriate way. there is also some cultural issues and i mean, there were no doubt a number of problems. i would just say to that end, i know that secretary clinton was unable to be able to testify in an open setting. i do think it's imperative for all concerned that she testify prior to any changing of the machine. i think that is
CSPAN
Dec 20, 2012 12:00pm EST
will come here to washington and ask us to help them out from their bad decisions. i hope at that time that we can show by pointing at these states and these right ideas that we know the solutions at the state level and that we also know that we can change how we think here at the federal level and make our country work a lot better. i i leave here with a lot of respect for my colleagues. i know my democrat colleagues believe with conviction their ideas. and i know my republican colleagues do too. but i hope we can look at the facts. i hope we can look at the real world. i hope we can look at what's working and set aside the politics and realize what really makes this country great and strong is when we move dollars and decisions out of washington back to people and communities and to states, that it works. not for 2% but for 100% of americans. i feel like our customers in the senate, at the heritage foundation, or wherever we go, are 100% of americans who these ideas can work for to build a better future and a stronger america. and i'm not leaving the fight. i hope to raise my game at
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2012 1:00am EST
at princeton university, we co-taught a course on ethics and public policy, and that led to us co-authoring several books on deliberation and democracy. >> host: in the spirit of compromise, president, you give two examples, the tax reform and the health care act. if you would, walk us through that. >> guest: so this is a tale of two compromises, and it begins with ronald reagan, presidency, where tax reform was a humanly important issue, and hugely difficult issue to get done between republicans and democrats. those of us who lived through the reagan era recognized people thought they were polarized. tip a stanch liberal democrat, reagan, a republican. yes, they crafted a bipartisan compromise with bradley, packwood, be part of the movers of the compromise. farce -- fast forward to the affordable care act, it was arguably for difficult to craft a compromise within one party, the democratic party, because of the permanent campaign, and not just polarized, but resistance how the two parties were. the comparison between the tax reform act and the affordable care act helps to see how
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 3:30pm EST
over the fiscal cliff and will take almost every american with us. almost every family that pays taxes now will pay higher taxes. people's jobs will immediately be put in jeopardy, unemployment compensation will end for more than 2 million people, our defenses will be decimated by cuts that will put us in a position of accepting really unacceptable risks to our security, title 1 programs of education for low-income children will be cut dramatically, most people, including the congressional budget office, our own congressional budget office, say that the combination of tax increases along with the decreased spending required under the budget control act will push our economy back into recession in the new year. so i don't agree that no deal is better than a bad deal. in this case, i repeat, no deal is the worst deal because it allows our country to go over the fiscal cliff and really hurts almost every american family in our country, in our economy, as a whole. this shouldn't be a surprise to us. it's not as if, if i could use the metaphor, that congress was going along in a bus and --
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 7:00pm EST
by fire about general george armstrong custer. our guest is louise barnett. we thank you for joining us. >> guest: thank you area match. >> now, william souder recounts the life of dick darman. she offered an indictment of insecticides including ddt in her book, "silent spring" published in 1962. following the publication, ddt was banned and the environmental protection agency created. this year marks the 50th anniversary of the publication of "silent spring." this is a little over an hour. [applause] >> thank you. thank you overcoming tonight to this wonderful facility. i love coming here. i always remind these guys are so fortunate to work at the national conservation training center. it's a really terrific facility. nice to be back here. nice to see all of you. i guess and the warm-up act for the presidential debate later tonight. i promise no spin and i promise to finish in time so that those of you who can't get enough of politics will be able to go see it, although i don't know who that would be at this point. i'm sure we all want to see the debate, so we will finish on time for
CSPAN
Dec 12, 2012 9:00am EST
is used to guide us, but a waste of money. the government should be involved in the. unfortunately, there are times when people evaluate investments that help our poorest children, the people in the toughest, most disadvantaged neighborhoods, some of our most intractable problems even with, for example, young people rescued from trafficking. these are very, very difficult problems. and we should evaluate and see what works. but we should also insist again there's not a double standard, so that if an evaluation, single evaluation or even a couple of evaluations somehow show that a particular strategy is not worth well, that is a motivation to do things better and smarter, not an excuse or reason to say government has no business being involved in that endeavor. so i think we need to be more change, accountability, evaluation, but not a tougher, higher double standard just when it comes to young people from the most disadvantaged and troubled environment. so there is so much to talk about in the innovation area. let me just mention a few things that we are focused on and then we can
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 6:00pm EST
, then the sequestration across-the-board cuts kick back n of course the final word rests right here with us in congress. o.m.b.'s decision with be overridden by a joint resolution. every provision of the calm act o the senate. in fact, at one time or another, nearly every feature of this plan has been offered by both republicans and democrats, including president obama and speaker boehner. all i've done is pull them together to offer them has a compassionate alternative to what happens if we go over the fiscal cliff. true, from the very beginning i have favored a comprehensive solution to put our fiscal house in orderings something along the lines of the simpson-bowles. we don't have that luxury right now. but perhaps it will only soften the blow of the fiscal cliff but also give us a sense of urgency about a grand bargain to repair our financial house. i am not so naive as to believe everybody is going to check their politics at the door, even at this late hour, but this is not a time for politicking, bickering or partisan games. to allow the country to plunge over the fiscal cliff without any alternativ
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 12:30pm EST
shifted. these terms are precise or scientific, but it's still useful constructs for thinking about what changed in 1962. environmentalism is different in several important ways. it's a little more pessimistic, not nearly as forward-looking and are much more immediate, urgent and dyer and with the evolution of environmental thinking, we begin to focus more and more on ourselves come over before the species of concern may be a fish or bird or species of some kind or for his spirit must rethink about the environment and our place an icon of the species of concern became honest. what we were doing to the environment and to ourselves in the process. so i think when we look back five decades in the rearview mirror, we can actually see the beginnings of this change in the way we think about the natural world. i call rachel carson a tipping point between these two things. she had a strong presence in the conservation movement and was really an effect founder of the modern environmental movement. i think it's possible to point to a specific movement in time when that happened, when we begin to t
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 1:00am EST
falk. all my father left us early. lost or stolen or strayed and my mother raised us and i spent time in an orphanage when i was an infant. my mother raised us on their own my generation was the first generation to go to college. she is a hell of a lot smarter than i am in dishy wanted to get a high-school but there was none to go to at that time. she wanted us to get educated. >>host: when do you being interested in public policy? >> i started to do legal history and michigan. with the draft enacted to the civil war. with all of the materials generated from agencies have the power is exercised how do the powerless get people to listen to them? because when you go to use in antonio texas the first commission held with latinos that i write about nobody answers-- listens to them and kids worse days kicked at a school because spanish as a dirty language. the conditions were awful. or if you read about otis do was and were run over by a car and the commission was sent to him because he was a korean war veteran. they stopped the car and shot him for no reason. later it was because he was b
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 10:30am EST
rich, rats, cross-country , the throw you don't know, and the one that brings us here, my american revolution. in mine and humble opinion each of these books is its own line and masterpiece. wonderfully idiosyncratic, uniquely incisive. each is an investigation of the american my state and song skate into relative with the american landscape. fleet contends the obvious, whether a garbage dump comes or the species despise rodents or family richard or a transcendental and back and allows us to see what we didn't and will we couldn't will we didn't want to, the spiritual, historical, and is essential connections that exposed, so vert, demolish are comfortable presumptions and require us to perceive people and places and, yes, ra t s with fresh eyes. i have been amazed, enlightened, educated, entertained. none more so than my american revolution. until i read his book, i thought i was reasonably conversant for college graduate of 40 years ago about the american revolution. the war we all know, but mostly in massachusetts, virginia, and the carolinas. war in which the high road, no army
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2012 5:00pm EST
us from england, and to make us free. human rights day is about advancing equality and the american constitution as it has expanded over the years to include new groups of people and strike down barriers of race and gender, ethnic background, national origin. it is about the progress of human rights and equality, the noblest of causes for this nation and what brings us together in many ways as americans. the fight for freedom. the search for equality. and justice. and i want to talk about three specific ways that we can advance the cause of human rights in this chamber, in this session through measures that are before us. the first concerns human trafficking. i've been particularly interested in the rampant human trafficking problems on american bases abroad in places like iraq and afghanistan. victims are recruited from third countries like bangladesh and the philippines and charged exorbitant fees to travel to their work sites often misled about where they're going, what that are salaries will be and what their living conditions will be like. frequently their passports are confisc
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 12:00am EST
sullivan is not the robert sullivan who is with us this evening. not exactly, but more about that in a moment. first this robert sullivan is the author of seven extraordinary books, meadowlands, the whale hunt, how do not to get rich, rats, cross-country, the thoreau you don't know and the one that brings us here to delancey st., "my american revolution." in my humble opinion each of these books is in its way a masterpiece. wonderfully idiosyncratic, uniquely incisive, e. tizon investigation of the american mindscape and sulzgeber related with the american landscape. each confronts the obvious, where there are garbage drunk -- garbage dump or a family road trip or a transcendental windbag and allows us to see what we didn't and what we couldn't and that we did not want to, the spiritual, historical, existential connections that expose, subvert, demolish presumptions and require us to receive people and places and yes, rats with fresh eyes. i've been amazed, enlightened, educated and contained by robert sullivan's books, none more so than "my american revolution." until i read
CSPAN
Dec 19, 2012 12:00pm EST
enough time discussing ways to help them assimilate into civilian life. as the son of a u.s. air force veteran who spent 31 years in the air force, i'm acutely aware, as coul kay is, that it t just those that wear the uniform that serve, but their families as well. many returning vets and their families encounter a whole range of social and economic hardships that can be hard to overcome. most notably, the unemployment rate among our returning vets from afghanistan and iraq is significantly higher than for the general population, something i know kay has worked on extensively. she's also worked to get our veterans the medical assistance, the job training and the financial support they need. indeed, i don't know of any senator that's done more to help america's heroes adjust to life after the military. that's just one of the reasons why she will be sorely missed. here's another reason, though: kay has fought time and time again to promote tax relief for hardworking texas families. in thehooin the mid-1990's, shed create the so-called homemaker ira to make sure that stay-at-home moms and
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2012 9:00am EST
as difficult as one. we are sorry jeanne could be with us but we're fortunate to have represented schwarz with as representing a dish in philadelphia, and urban philadelphia, vice ranking democratic member on the committee on the ways and means committee. i want to have a conversation, that reflects kind of the dual nature of the to do list that the public can send it in the pulpit on the one hand when you ask them the most immediate challenge in washington today, with the most wanted ashington to do, they to talk about deficit or the debt, getting the fiscal house in order. but that is not the full extent. right behind that is education, retirement, good paying jobs with very different by the way, talk about priorities along partisan and racial lines. let's start with where we are and where the public not surprisingly is on the question of solving the immediate fiscal cliff decision. how would you describe your feeling that there will be some kind of accommodation deals these on the tax or the spending side, or both? >> first of all, good morning. and just, i'm not gene sperling. but i'm
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2012 11:00pm EST
vote early. >> your list of your photo i.d., utility bill, you can use all those things or you can when you are voting early, you write your name, address, date of birth, driver's license number, they will ask for it with your social security number or you can provide one of these 13 additional items in your signature a and a cross check that against the database, and that talks it works in our state. estimates are you voting early at your courthouse or are you voting early in the different areas. >> or the designated area members. >> in west virginia we have early voting in the courthouse and we also have what is called satellite. so, i am trying to figure out how you do that. how you cannot ask for -- >> because you are using the driver's license number or the last digits of the security number and checking that come and before that envelope is opened the check that against the statewide data base where is your signature excess of the electronic file and where all of that information access on the physical copy of it and then that is the same way if you vote by mail you are not we to
CSPAN
Dec 13, 2012 9:00am EST
it off for commercial uses. that could include financial rewards associated with the revenue from its subsequent auction for commercial use. it could also include structure rewards in the budget and appropriations process, and finally i think that these ideas are consistent with the idea of synthetic currency which was proposed by the president's council of advisors of science and technology. in their recent report on federal spectrum use. >> thank you. i guess my last question to the chairman, commissioner pai suggested june 30, 2013 as a deadline for the auction to is that a reasonable or an achievable date? >> i think i stand be corrected but i think 2014. >> 2014, sorry. >> so 2014 is when we're talking to a deep we will know more about what would maximize the benefits of the auction as comments coming. but we're certainly on a path to conduct the auction in 2014. >> thank you, mr. chairman. >> gentlelady yield back the gentlelady yield back about summertime. chair recognizes the gentleman from kentucky for five minutes. >> i really appreciate the commissioners for being here toda
CSPAN
Dec 3, 2012 12:00pm EST
and fabulous and amazing. pick your favorite color this is brand new u.s. the first audience to see id.it is scheduled tonight but i did not think it will be there so you should get yours now item213-857. i am so excited! we have a lot of fun things coming. we would love to hear from you 1-866-376-8255 >>host: also definitely join us in the live chat we have someone there that will be saying hello to you. we love girls and the live chat. nload that application for free bite diallingtar star hsn.you can also join me on facebook page i am colleen lopez on hsn. i hope you are in the mood for shopping because we have special things in store for you. including the biggest and best value ever on the herkimer quartz is our beautiful earring today's special, hit it comes [♪ music ♪] >>host: look at the gorgeous collette she is dripping and herkimer. if you fell asleep last night, we knew this would be popular but almost 16,000 are out the door. majority of our day supply gone in the midnight showing. if you have been looking for the most gorgeous uniquely beautiful earring (...)this wi
CSPAN
Dec 11, 2012 12:00pm EST
-bearing accounts at banks and credit unions. these transaction accounts are used by businesses, local governments, hospitals, and other nonprofit organizations for payroll and other recurrent expenses. and this program provides certainty to businesses in uncertain times. these accounts are also important to our nation's smallest financial institutions. in fact, 90% of community banks with assets under $10 billion have tag deposits. this program allows these institutions to serve the banking needs of the small businesses in their communities, keeping deposits local. in my state of south dakota, i know that the tag program is important to banks, credit unions, and small businesses. our nation's economy is certainly in a different place than it was in 2008 at the height of the financial crisis when this program was created. but with concerns about the fiscal cliff and continued instability in european markets, i believe a temporary extension is needed. therefore, i believe a clean two-year extension makes the most sense. it provides the most certainty for business and financial institutions. it also
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 8:15pm EST
, in afghanistan people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they've all come there. there is a big crowd on the mall. ayaan going to speak to you today about this great historic subject, this great american institution. and i am going to do it in the same way in which i organized the book. the book is not chronological. it's not divided that starts off with george washington and then john adams and guinn for the president. instead, its slash the various parts of the day, and within each part of the day i sprinkle with vignettes some of the very serious and some of them traditional. a lot of them are all events because i'm always looking for those. i'm also going to cover some things that we are not going to see in the of coming inauguration in january because this time we don't have a change of power so we are not going to have that transition as we see sometimes but nevertheless at inauguration when a president does leave office here is the white eisenhower thinking the staff at the white house. at the same time the incoming president they are leaving the house getting ready for t
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 4:00pm EST
around the country, paris, barack, afghanistan, people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they have all come there. there is a big crowd of a mall. of going to speak to you today about this great historic subject to my great american institution the end of not -- i'm going to do it in the same way in which i organize the book rather, the book is not chronological, it's not divided up. this touch of a george washington in mid john adams and went to the president in order. instead is divided up by the various parts of the day. within each part of the day i sprinkle in vignettes. some of them very serious, some of them, of course, very traditional command a lot of them on all events because i'm always looking for those, too. i'm also going to cover some things that were not going tessie in the upcoming in a garish in january because this time we don't have a change of power. we're not going to have the transition as we see some times. nevertheless, in the morning at inaugurations when a president does leave office, 1961, here is toyed d. eisenhower thinking the staff at the
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 7:15pm EST
. said to use collection contains (101)763-1783 examines reports from the sugar 1764 to that of the concorde and. it's about one hour 15 minutes. >> it's an honor to speak here at the old state house. thank you for coming. thank you of the tv and c-span for joining us here. about three weeks into the design of reporting the revolutionary war, we realized we were on pace to produce an 800 page, two-inch thick volume. so we quickly cut corners and retrace our steps and decided to kill back and produce what is now a 400 page full-color book for you. similarly, i prepared a five-hour presentation for you this evening and decided to scale back back to a more manageable 45 minutes. so i will start by saying that without newspapers, there would no american revolution. newspapers would fans rebellion. the same royalty to the cause and provide critical correspondence during the war and ultimately aided in the outcome. historians knows very well. for 200 plus years, historians have referenced these newspapers in the footnotes of their analysis and interpretation. what this book
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 11:15am EST
us. i think the things we don't do is to think about where we have the most people the fastest. thinking about per capita returns on investment, and i think that our biggest weakness as a nation is community colleges. it's the skill gap that we have left open, left wide open between the industries that we are holding onto as we compete globally and how well we have done educating the people to take their place in the economy, and i would hope that whatever agenda comes forward we have an agenda that is deeply, deeply focused on adult learning, and of education, community colleges and finding more ways for people to constructively enter the economy. >> counselor? >> i would concur on those points. i'm grateful i live in a state that has a governor deval patrick and living in a country with president barack obama. one of the reasons you just stated in creating better access to both educational opportunities and health care which is eliminating all of those other disparities. it's important we not upset about the 99% of the 47% and just remember that there are people behind all of
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 1:00pm EST
rights and continuing struggle for freedom in america. mary frances berry, when did the u.s. civil rights commission began and why? >> guest: well, the civil rights commission started in 1957. president eisenhower had a lot of discussions with john foster dulles, secretary of state about the way the united states is seen around the world because of the racism going on, that people would hear about and read about and the fact that there seemed to be a lot of episodes that kept happening, whether as lynching or some discrimination taking place in the country. so the idea was eisenhower said he was going to ask congress to set up a civil rights commission, which would put the facts on top of the table. i'm told by one of the people who was at the meeting that he slammed the table and said there are the facts on top of the table. and commission says we know who do policy sometimes set up because there's a tough problem and people don't want to do anything about it. they get a report on it goes away. this commission was supposed to put the facts on top of the table and then its future would de
CSPAN
Dec 5, 2012 9:00am EST
government in 2003. this road will contribute to the economy, enabling us to contribute to the regeneration of uk? >> can i thank my honorable friend for campaigning assiduously for this. he has made a very strong case for how this new road will open up the prospect really economic governments as well as dealing with traffic congestion. and it's exactly the program we can undertake that didn't happen under the last labour government because we made the switch. again, i congratulate him for the campaign he has fought which i think is -- [inaudible] >> given the falling number of nurses in the nhs, does he recognize that people view with skepticism what you said about protection to the nhs? will he acknowledge that passing on a 2% cut to local government will cut adult social services across the country? the foldable, the disabled, the elderly. >> just -- for so we provided billions more, but -- let me just say this point to the labour party. they want to be in government and they claim they want to cut the deficit. what would they cut? what would they cut? if they object to the local governm
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 1:25pm EST
of the salvation army and changing the role in the u.s.. islamic the salvation army which many people don't realize is an evangelical religious group, not just a group that rings bells outside of department stores in the christmas season it's what they call the cathedral of the open air and would go into areas especially impoverished areas would have parades' and make lots of malaise the symbols trying to attract especially the urban poor back into the religious life. this came against the requirements of many cities that any trade would be permitted, for exhibit, and in the salvation army they made it a practice not to apply and to be arrested often playing their instruments on the way into the cell and challenging them as antireligious, and they won a lot of them. they also lost a lot of them so they kind of destabilized the law in the states by challenging these restrictions. they never really needed to the supreme court of the united states the because the states were still in howard. >> professor gordon, when did the first major religious case come before the supreme court? >> the cases from t
CSPAN
Dec 17, 2012 1:25am EST
trouble. >> host: what was one of the cases, walk us through. >> guest: an interesting case called cantwell against connecticut involved a group of witnesses that had gone into a catholic neighborhood in new haven on a sunday morning and began playing anti-catholic records on portable phonographs and distributing literature, and they were arrested for disturbing the peace and preaching without a permit, and appealed their case all the way to the supreme court which said that because connecticut said, well, individual city administrators would decide what a valid program was for religious organizations and would allow them or not on to the streets, they said that allows too much discretion by the state government, and they applied for the first time part of that first amendment, this time, the free exercise clause, as against the state of connecticut, and overturned their law that allowed city officials to license or not as they saw fit. >> host: and did that lead to any nationwide movements, or was it a well publicized case at the time? >> guest: it was a relatively well publicized
CSPAN
Dec 17, 2012 1:00am EST
in the u.s.? >> guest: well, one of the issues that i try to deal with in the book is the process by which slavery ended, and the geographical reach of slavery. i think the view that tends to be handed down is by the 19th century, certainly, a country neatly divided between the so-called free states and the so-called slave state, and, of course, the civil war growing out of that conflict. my issue is not whether slavery's at the root of the civil war, which it certainly was, but what interested me was the relationship between the early emancipation of slaves in the northern states, and the later emancipation of slaves much larger in scale in the southern states. slavery was legal in all of the british colonies and all of north america at the end of the 18th century, and gradually, northern states and northeast and mid an lat tick states began to abolish slavely, but i learned it was a gradual process. it took a long time. what we discoveredded there were laves in new jersey in 1860, and most of the states that abolished slavery between 1780 and 1804, the period we customarily looked at, ha
CSPAN
Dec 17, 2012 8:30am EST
of tomorrow's only broadband and not broadcast. >> host: senator gordon smith joins us as we begin part of discussions on the future of television. he is the president and ceo of the national association of broadcasters. thank you, sir. >> guest: thank you. >> host: and ted gotsch of "telecommunications report," thank you b the for being on "the communicators." >> thanks for having me. >> just ahead, the first of two forums from a recent conference examining the 201 2 elections with jeremy byrd. then two secretaries of state discuss the impact of voter id laws. after that we're hive from the brookings institution on the future of egypt following it constitutional refer dumb, and later another live forum examining a proposal to raise medicare's eligibility age. >> also today a discussion with some of the leaders who have helped create what's known as e-government. this month marks the tenth anniversary of the act that was helped to allow federal agencies to deliver information for mishtly using the -- efficiently using the internet. you can see live coverage beginning at 9 a.m. eastern o
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 5:00pm EST
. tell us what how they locked horns other this. >> well, it would have to be one of the oldest debate thaict history and social science. it's a date predates the idea there is a thing of social ions. if you go back to later the idea that social forces are what really explain human outcomes. the people were there, which different people died of heart attack and replaced by someone else. what happens the stuff that mattered would have ended up being about the same. marx famously make argument of napoleon. in the essay in theory about louis that poll began. it's not about him. it's about the class struggle of the social forces. it's become a history or political science without proper nouns. no people involved. car legal takes the most extreme opposite position. history is nothing but the biography of great men. it's caricatured as a after anothermen. you cannot get further apart in the view of the world than these two. both arguments make sense. the social scientist following in the tradition of, you know, not just marx but social scientists say there are three reasons why leaders don't
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 1:00pm EST
of the revolutionary war, which separated us from our mother country, but if you recall, i know you weren't there then, but if you recall it -- historically speaking our founding fathers crafted a compromise that created the constitution. they were as polarized as any set of americans who had been throughout our country and history. there were a pro and anti slavery and yet they compromised. so, yes, we were founded in compromise. today compromise has become more difficult than ever before. >> what do you mean when you talk about the uncompromising mindset? >> well, we live in an era that has been characterized as a permanent campaign where every day is election day. and campaigning and elections make for uncompromising line sets. you stand on your principles to mobilize your base, draw in endless amounts now of money. the 24 / seven news cycle covers politics as if it is a horse race in the horses are on steroids in this terrorist of the money is coming in to fund the campaign. so what we mean by the uncompromising mindset is a mindset that is geared toward elections and not toward governing. >> you
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 9:00am EST
our politics today, and that divide us so. so that was the goal. that's the mission as it were, but what are the big issues? one of the issues that a history of strom thurmond's americaspeaks to? we remember, a lot of us remember who strom thurmond was. strom thurmond was a 1948 presidential candidate. strom thurmond was one of the lead authors of the 1956 southern manifesto. this is the protest the supreme court decision in the brown v. board of education decision 1954. strom thurmond is a recordholder to this day of the longest one man filibuster. and again his work pashtun and the guinness book of world records, 24 hours and 18 minutes he spoke against the 1957 civil rights bill. we remember strom thurmond today as one of the last of the jim crow demagogues. and he was. he was that. he was one of the last jim crow demagogue. what we forget about thurmond is that he was also one of the first of the sun belt conservatives. what do i mean by that? what's a sun belt conservative? the sun belt, it's one of the big stories, one of the major stories in the history of 20th century a
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 1:00pm EST
know about slavery in the u.s.? >> well, one of the issues i try to deal with in the book is the process by which slavery ended and the geographical reach of slavery. the view that tends to be handed down is by the 19th century certainly of the country neatly divided between the so-called free states and the so-called slave states and the civil war growing out of the conflict. my issue is not whether slavery is at the root of the civil war, which is certainly was, but what interested me was the relationship between the early emancipation of slaves in the northern states and the leader emancipation much larger in scale in the southern states. slavery was legal in all of the british colonies and all of north america at the end of the 18th-century, and gradually northern states, northeast and mid-atlantic states abolished slavery but i realized this was a gradual process that took a long time. that what we discovered as there was leaves a new jersey in the 1860's, and most of the states that abolished slavery between c-17 80 and 1804 which is the period that we customarily lo
CSPAN
Dec 21, 2012 12:00pm EST
oh oh ♪ >> let us join our prayers with those of the church universal saying each in our own language the prayer that jesus christ has taught us. our father who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name, they kingdom come, thy will be done as on earth as it is in heaven. give us this day our daily bread and forgive our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass us. lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil for thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory forever and ever, amen. for our brother, daniel, let us pray to our lord jesus christ who said, i am resurrection, and i am life. lord, you consoled martha and mary in their disstress, draw near to us who mourn for daniel and dry the tears of those who weep. >> hear us, lord. >> you wept at the grave of lazerus, your friend. comfort us in our sorrow. >> hear us, lord. >> you raised the dead to life. give to our brother eternal life. >> hear us, lord. >> you promised paradise to the thief who repented. bring our brother to the joys of help. >> hear us, lord. >> comfort us in our sorrows at the death of our brother, let our
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 4:30pm EST
czech, u.s. navy, monroeville. commander job w. price, u.s. navy, potts town. major wesley james hinckley, united states army, cumberland city. i yield back to the senior senator. mr. casey: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senior senator from pennsylvania. mr. casey: i want to thank senator toomey for reading the first half of our names. i'll continue with 20 more names. sergeant derrick lee shanfield, united states marine corps, hastings, pennsylvania. sergeant first class robert james fike, united states army. sergeant first class brian allen hoover, united states army, west elizabeth. sergeant joseph davis caskey, united states marine corps, pittsburgh. lance corporal joshua thomas twigg, united states marine corps, be indiana. corporal joshua alexander hartin, united states army, bethlehem. lance corporal ralph john fabree, united states marine corps. staff sergeant david g. weigel, united states army, philadelphia, pennsylvania. corporal eric michael torbit, jr., united states marine corps, lancaster. corporal gerald lee king, united states army, eerie. sergeant ro
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